Monday, April 21, 2014

Newmusicmonday #114:: Prince Innocence


Prince-Innocence
This intermittent installment of Newmusicmonday features Prince Innocence, consisting of Josh McIntyre and Talvi Faustmann. This short interview gives a brief introduction to the band, but I liken their synth pop sound to 80s Giorgio Moroder cleaned up and updated for 2014. One of my favorite tracks is "Dissipate" that slips around you with its sexy charm:
"Golden Hour" has that Moroder sound: PRINCE INNOCENCE - GOLDEN HOUR from jason harvey on Vimeo. I really like the cinematography for the video for "To My Right":  and "Girls" & "Shells" both hold tight a melancholia within that doesn't let you totally forget your bittersweet life.

Sunday, April 20, 2014

MadMen "Time Zones": Bossy Girls & Disposable Men

elisabeth-moss-mad-men-701-time-zones"Time Zones" (s7e1) was interesting, but I might be reading way too much into things, which I'm wont to do. So, I was looking for the current themes that Weiner et al. are projecting onto 1969 and I sensed two. One was "Lean In" & the other was the disposable male. While on the surface, there are a lot of transitions going on in the wake of the agency's musical chairs, I think Joan & Peggy were the most interesting stories. 

Peggy has always been about competence on the job, while Joan has a preternatural understanding of org politics and embeddedness. Peggy no longer has a mentor to watch over her and I don't think she wants one. She feels she has the chops, but wants to put her imprimatur on the work she does. She doesn't always connect with people well or play the political game cleanly (like with her new boss) and is smart enough to know it. Joan is tired of being treated like a secretary and while she has performed her role well at the agency, she now wants mastery of accounts, not ops. Both Peggy and Joan want what the other has. In "Lean in" speak, Joan got her seat at the table & now is seeking greater legitimacy. Peggy is navigating the "jungle gym" of org politics, particularly after the shakeup.

Don & Roger are having to tackle with their own obsolescence in their personal lives. Don always does his balancing act between control and destruction. His (what I call) "50 shades of Draper" escapade with the neighbor last season put a fine point on that. Don realizes he's all dramaturgy (albeit talented), but he sometimes is having trouble controlling his masks. Megan doesn't need him and doesn't seem to really want him, at this point. Roger still wants to be the grand patriarch and has been able to smooth over his transgressions with cash. His control over his daughter is in jeopardy now she has found "truth, light, & forgiveness", but another sticky wicket is his inability to control Joan and her love life. 

OK, so while this was supposedly 1969, in my experience over many years of going to Canters on Fairfax, I never got a sandwich that fast.